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End of the Reign of Europe's Competition Enforcer
 
LONDON: Barclays' chief executive, Antony Jenkins, said Monday that he would forgo a bonus for 2013 in light of the bank's continued restructuring costs and litigation expenses.

Jenkins said the bank had made progress in regaining the trust of the British public and shaping its business, but still paid "very significant costs" last year to address previous litigation and conduct issues and to exit business lines as part of its continued restructuring.


LONDON: Barclays' chief executive, Antony Jenkins, said Monday that he would forgo a bonus for 2013 in light of the bank's continued restructuring costs and litigation expenses.

Jenkins said the bank had made progress in regaining the trust of the British public and shaping its business, but still paid "very significant costs" last year to address previous litigation and conduct issues and to exit business lines as part of its continued restructuring.


LONDON: Barclays' chief executive, Antony Jenkins, said Monday that he would forgo a bonus for 2013 in light of the bank's continued restructuring costs and litigation expenses.

Jenkins said the bank had made progress in regaining the trust of the British public and shaping its business, but still paid "very significant costs" last year to address previous litigation and conduct issues and to exit business lines as part of its continued restructuring.

"When combined with the s ..

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/29847101.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
LONDON: Barclays' chief executive, Antony Jenkins, said Monday that he would forgo a bonus for 2013 in light of the bank's continued restructuring costs and litigation expenses.

Jenkins said the bank had made progress in regaining the trust of the British public and shaping its business, but still paid "very significant costs" last year to address previous litigation and conduct issues and to exit business lines as part of its continued restructuring.

"When combined with the s ..

LONDON: Barclays' chief executive, Antony Jenkins, said Monday that he would forgo a bonus for 2013 in light of the bank's continued restructuring costs and litigation expenses.

Jenkins said the bank had made progress in regaining the trust of the British public and shaping its business, but still paid "very significant costs" last year to address previous litigation and conduct issues and to exit business lines as part of its continued restructuring.

"When combined with the s ..

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/29847101.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
LONDON: Barclays' chief executive, Antony Jenkins, said Monday that he would forgo a bonus for 2013 in light of the bank's continued restructuring costs and litigation expenses.

Jenkins said the bank had made progress in regaining the trust of the British public and shaping its business, but still paid "very significant costs" last year to address previous litigation and conduct issues and to exit business lines as part of its continued restructuring.

"When combined with the s ..

PARIS — The clock is ticking for the European Union’s antitrust chief, whose extensive powers put him in the front line of battles with industrial titans.

In his remaining time in office Joaquín Almunia, the Europe’s competition commissioner, is set to make landmark decisions on whether Google, the American search giant, and Gazprom, the Russian gas monopoly, have abused their dominant market positions.

His term officially ends in November, but Brussels insiders say that Mr. Almunia, a Socialist politician from Spain, may have to make a move before mid-April, when some of his commission colleagues are expected to step down in preparation for European parliamentary elections.

That leaves Mr. Almunia, who has been in office since 2009, only a few weeks to either reach settlements with Google and Gazprom in exchange for commitments to change their business practices or to put together formal charges against the companies.

Despite deep misgivings among software rivals, Mr. Almunia seems poised to strike a deal with Google after having rejected the company’s first two rounds of concessions, a senior European official said, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the confidentiality of competition regulation.

Barring a change of heart in Moscow, Mr. Almunia is likely to lay formal charges against Gazprom for discriminating among European customers over the price at which it sells gas, the official said. That would leave a final decision to his successor, who the Kremlin may hope will be more cooperative.